Tag Archives: studying

And…breathe

I haven’t been around blog world for about a month now, and I’ve missed you all. I was busy finishing off my last two essays and dissertation, and so had to stay right away from blog posts to avoid distraction. Yesterday I handed it all in and I’m finished, hurrah!!! It was definitely a challenge doing it in one year rather than the three years that was the more usual option, but I’m so pleased that I chose that route because now I’m finished, hurrah!!! (Did I say that already?).

In the year of my course I wrote six 4,000 word essays and one 18,000 word dissertation, obviously it’s all the reading and research around each one that takes the most time. With each essay, and the dissertation, I seemed to go through the same kind of anxiety pattern, and I decided to turn that into a chart for your entertainment (To read it, you’ll probably have to click on it to open it up bigger, unless you’re on a phone or other small device in which case you’re going to struggle to read it whatever, and therefore I wouldn’t bother trying, just accept that you would have really liked it if you’d been able to read it, so just smile and nod).

Essay anxiety chart

What’s been happening in blog world then? I clearly won’t be able to catch up on all the posts I missed, but I will gradually make my rounds and visit my regulars. In the meantime, if there are any posts you wrote (or saw) in the last month that you really think I should read, then by all means pop a link to them in the comments and I shall endeavour to visit soon.

Hope everyone is well, and I’m looking forward to getting back into the swing of things around here again now!

 

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Disconnected Reflections As I Enter The Home Straight

Equality does not mean justice

This picture is a good representation of some of the issues I’ve looked at. There are so many versions of it online I don’t know where it originated in order to credit properly

We’ll be back to some funny stuff around here soon, but not yet. I’m nearing the end of my Masters Degree, and over the year that I’ve been working on it, I’ve kept note of little facts and quotes that I’ve found interesting, or things that I’ve learned which I wanted to remember because they’ll be useful in other contexts. There are far too many to share in one post, so I’ve selected a few…

I’ve learned that:

– If I reach the point where I feel blocked in my writing, whether from writing exhaustion, or lack of inspiration, and I’m just staring at a blank screen, I can break through that block by simply changing something physical about what I’m doing. This usually means either picking up my laptop and moving to a different room, or switching to writing a few paragraphs in longhand on paper instead (yes, I still have to type it up later, but it’s worth it just to break through the block). I can’t fully express quite how incredibly effective this method is for me. Previously I would have either taken a break, or switched to a different task, but this way I can carry right on with what I’m doing which is sometimes what needs to be done.

– Goal setting doesn’t work for me. I always knew this really but because it’s repeatedly put forward as the best way to achieve things, I kept doing it, and kept feeling like a failure when I didn’t achieve my goals. During my course I read an article by Joanna Swann who is fiercely opposed to the practice of goal and target setting; she speaks particularly about the field of education, but what she says can be applied wider. In short, she puts forward an alternative method of achieving what needs to be achieved, by articulating it as a series of problems that need to be resolved rather than goals or targets that need to be met. Clearly everybody is different, but what she said really resonated with me and it’s worked when I’ve put it into practice. (I have already mentioned this to a few other bloggers individually).

– When I’ve completed a writing session, it’s worth spending a couple of minutes jotting down where I had got to in my thought process and what I was planning to write about next. It makes it much easier to get right back into it next time. It’s so easy to forget where we were in our thought process if we leave it, even for a day.

Studying

A picture from one of my study days at home – not too shabby right?

A couple of quotes I liked:

– “We become conscious of many of our expectations only when they are disappointed, owing to their being unfulfilled. An example would be encountering an unexpected step in one’s path: it is the unexpectedness of the step which may make us conscious of the fact that we expected to encounter an even surface.” (Karl Popper)

– “He who loses his crown and lives without it is more than a king: from the rank of a king he rises to the rank of a man.” (Jean-Jack Rousseau)

A couple of things that came up which made me think:

– The Chinese (as I understand it) believe that the differences in educational achievement between students are attributed primarily to the different rates at which people learn, and not to different ceilings that people are capable of reaching. Whilst I don’t wholly embrace that view, I do think it’s worth considering in part, especially when we talk about helping children to “reach their full potential” which is a term that I’ve always been a bit uncomfortable with, because I find it actually quite limiting.

– If a teacher said that they had a child of 14 years old in their class who couldn’t read or write very well, or couldn’t add up simple numbers, we would probably describe that child as having special educational needs (or in the UK we would, other countries have other terms of course). Whereas if a teacher said they had a child of 14 years old on their class who wasn’t very good at composing music, or remembering dates in history, we wouldn’t attribute that to special needs, we’d just say that different people are good at different things.  So some subjects are deemed to be the deciders of whether people have something wrong with them or not. There are reasons behind that of course, but it’s still worth a little ponder before we make those judgments.

Studying with the cat

Another study day, with help from the cat

Right, better get back to those essays now…

If there are periods of time when I’m not around for periods of time…

Girl sleeping in woods with alarm clock

…it’s because I’m doing a Masters this year, in Education. I’m doing it in one year, which counts as full-time, rather than the alternative of three years part-time. I’m not giving up my job or anything else though, so I’m attempting to fit in a full-time course around my already full-capacity life! Brave? Crazy? We’ll find out. I don’t intend to stop blogging or visiting/commenting on other blogs, but I will clearly have to cut back. So if there are times when I disappear for a bit, don’t panic, I’ll just be writing an essay, or questioning my sanity, or something, and will be back soon enough (Phew, right?). I’ll probably be looking something like this:

Woman losing it

It’s also my birthday today, 43. This time last year I was announcing that I was now the answer to life, the universe and everything. However, the great wisdom that comes with that has thus far eluded me; I’m hoping the MA will help.

This is what the lovely cafeteria lady at work gave me this morning, what a sweetie she is:

Birthday scone

Hope your Septembers are going well so far!
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Girl in woods photo credit: martinak15 via photopin cc
Losing it woman photo credit: Locator via photopin cc